MYOPIA

Myopia (short-sightedness) is an optical inconvenience, requiring glasses or contact lenses or laser eye surgery. It imposes major challenges and costs for refractive correction, and for the treatment of associated pathological complications. Myopia is the leading cause of blindness in parts of East-Asia, and a top 3 cause in Ireland and parts of Europe, and is the leading cause of blindness among working age people in Europe.

 

  • It is estimated that 5 billion people will be myopic by 20501
  • 1 billion people at a significant risk of blindness
  • Major cause of uncorrectable visual impairment
  • Leading cause of permanent blindness among working age people in Europe

 

Treatment of Myopia

 

Currently accepted myopia treatments address only the visual blur caused by myopia. Treatment options for myopia related blindness, however, are limited. Treatment options such as under-correction of myopia, gas permeable contact lenses, and bifocal or multifocal spectacles have all been proven to be ineffective for myopia control, and no optical or pharmacological intervention has been adopted into routine clinical practice. The current state of the art, however, suggests two viable control candidates, atropine and peripheral-plus contact lenses.

 

CERI team is working to find a means to control and prevent myopia (short-sightedness) in children.

Our research is broad ranging, it includes:

- Schools projects to engage children, teachers and parents and inform them of the risks of myopia

- Clinical trials to investigate the potential of eye drops and contact lenses to slow down the progression of myopia

- Novel technology development projects to determine peoples risk of developing myopia, and biomedical devices for the prevention and optimal control of myopia.

 

We are now recruiting children to MOSAIC and CHAMP clinical trials, the first trials in a European population to assess the capacity of low-dose atropine eye drops to halt myopia. Given the inconvenience to people, the costs associated with lifelong care and the untreatable blindness it causes, this research could lead to dramatic and important public health benefit to communities and families in Ireland and across the world.

 

References:

1. Holden B, Fricke T et al. Global Prevalence of Myopia and High Myopia and Temporal Trends from 2000 through 2050. Ophthalmology 2016; Volume 123, Issue 5, Pages 1036–1042

 

CLINICAL TRIALS

MOSAIC (Myopia Outcome Study of Atropine In Children)

Primary objective:

  • To evaluate the capacity of 0.01% preservative free atropine eyedrops to reduce the rate of progression of myopia amongst European children.

 

Design:

  • Placebo controlled trial
  • Children aged 6 to 16 - Progressive Myopes
  • 2 year initial treatment & 1 year crossover
  • Participants are more than twice as likely to be on atropine from the start. The participants who do not receive atropine initially will start on atropine treatment later, meaning all participants will ultimately receive atropine treatment.

 

Study treatment:

  • Eye drop once nightly in both eyes for 2 years + crossover for a further 12 months. Participants are reviewed at 6 monthly intervals.

CHAMP (Children using Atropine for reduction of Myopia Progression)

Primary objective:

  • To evaluate the safety & efficacy of 2 concentrations of atropine sulfate ophthalmic solution (0.01% & 0.02%) compared to placebo (vehicle) for the reduction of progression of myopia over a 3-year treatment period.

 

Design:

  • Placebo controlled trial
  • Children aged 6 to 10 - Progressive Myopes
  • 3 year initial treatment & 1 year crossover
  • Participants are more than twice as likely to be on atropine from the start (Atropine 0.01% & Atropine 0.02%). The participants who do not receive atropine initially will start on atropine treatment later, meaning all participants will ultimately receive atropine treatment.

 

Study treatment:

  • Eye drop once nightly in both eyes for 3 years + crossover for a further 12 months after the initial phase. Participants are reviewed at 6 monthly intervals.

Centre for Eye Research Ireland  | TU Dublin

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